More thoughts on since vs. because. Or, Since you read my previous post…

In my previous post I talked about the use of since and because and how they are different or same. This piece is more a hangover due to the previous post. After having thought and talked about the grammar side of since vs. because, I still felt the previous post was not complete. While I talked more … Continue reading More thoughts on since vs. because. Or, Since you read my previous post…

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Since when since has been replaced by because? Or, to sin(ce) or not to sin(ce)?

The moment you started typing since, Google will suggest since vs because. Such is the power of this pair of words. The confusion stems from the fact that since and because are interchangeable, though not always. In fact, there is no confusion most of the times. Perhaps people were asked to clarify when there was … Continue reading Since when since has been replaced by because? Or, to sin(ce) or not to sin(ce)?

And there are myths

Recently I received a WhatsApp message, a picture message with Vivekananda, the great saint in his arms-crossed pose. Unusually, this time it was about English grammar. I was rather surprised. Many of his quotations are on meditation, Hinduism, devotion, and the like. Vivekananda on grammar? Hmm, interesting. But I immediately realized that a similar quotation was … Continue reading And there are myths

Mr Venn, tell me more

The last post explained how restrictive (or defining) relative clauses create a proper subset of a set. In other words, these clauses classify the noun into two: one that is governed by the relative clause definition; the other that is not. But an important observation here is, the subsets are not always proper, which means the relative … Continue reading Mr Venn, tell me more

Mr Venn, will you help us learn some English?

All right, now I got your question – rather, questions. Who's Mr Venn? Why would he come to teach English? What is he teaching now? Before you inundate me with all those questions, let me tell you about him. John Venn, FRS, FSA (4 August 1834 – 4 April 1923) was an English logician and philosopher … Continue reading Mr Venn, will you help us learn some English?

A Valentine’s Day and an Antecedent Accident

Feb 14, 2008. To say it was a Valentine's day is being redundant. It was when many of my colleagues and I were in our early and mid-20s, which made that V-day all the more special. We worked for an organization that believed fun in workplace. So someone proposed the idea of celebrating Valentine's day. I was … Continue reading A Valentine’s Day and an Antecedent Accident